Queensland’s proposed tree laws are the very worst kind of red tape

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Today I have a piece in Queensland Country Life arguing the new proposed vegetation clearing laws in Queensland will halt economic growth, suppress entrepreneurship, and damage our international competitiveness.

The strict changes will also reverse the onus of proof, retrospectively enforce the laws back to 17 March 2016, and remove exemptions for clearing high value agricultural land.

This is the latest in a series of contentious political games between the left and right of politics, with farmers and land owners sitting in between:

Jointly understanding that clearing is necessary for growth, and that farmers have the incentive to protect and cultivate their own land, meant very few clearing controls prior to the 1990s.

However, as the 1990s came so too did the growth and spread of conservation campaigns. Legislation changes in 1999 and 2004 largely phased out broadscale land clearing by the end of 2006.

Thankfully, in 2013 the then Newman government relaxed the clearing laws. But now the Labor government, following through on an election promise, will take us back to the 2006-2013 era when almost no broadscale clearing occurred:

Of course the environment must be protected and conserved. But what happened to the importance of economic growth and development?

Effective agricultural regulation draws a reasonable line between environmental protection and agricultural production.

It is undeniable that efficient agricultural production requires the felling of trees. By entirely preventing such clearing—even for high value productivity land—policy makers have clearly lost sight of the real purpose of regulation.

The proposed bill has been referred to a state parliamentary committee, which is due to report in June this year.

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