Is this the next step, following mandatory data retention?

Draft national security legislation revealed last Friday would add little value to Australia’s efforts to combat terrorism, and will be a significant regulatory burden on the telecommunications sector.

According to the exposure draft, the Telecommunications and Other Legislation Amendment Bill 2015 would if passed compel carriage service providers to “do their best” to

protect telecommunications networks and facilities from unauthorised interference, or unauthorised access, for the purposes of security. Carriers and carriage service providers must notify changes to telecommunications services or telecommunications systems that are likely to have a material adverse effect on their capacity to comply with this duty 

Since such service providers would naturally “do their best” to see that their networks are uncompromised, it is unclear what is added by the bill. It is fuzzy law at best, and would be remarkably difficult for a person to know if they are meeting their legal obligations.

While the national security benefits are unclear, the proposed regulatory burdens are not. For instance, section 314A(3) of the bill requires carriage service providers to notify the government (the “Communications Access Co-ordinator“) of its intention to implement a change to telecommunications services. Sections 315A and 315B could potentially see the Attorney-General issue directions to carriage service providers to “cease using or supplying… carriage services” or “to do, or to refrain from doing , a specified act or thing within the period specified in the direction.”

From mandatory data retention, to online piracy legislation, 2015 has seen a suite of burdensome but ineffectual laws passed at the intersection of technology, telecommunications and national security. If passed, these new proposals would add to that list.

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