Union membership at lowest rate in over 100 years

Screen Shot 2015-10-27 at 12.19.43 AMAustralia’s union membership is at its lowest point in over a century, according to new data released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

The latest employment data, released today, shows that union membership fell by more than 2 per cent—over 200,000 people—in a single year. The Australian reports:

Trade union membership declined markedly between August 2013 and 2014, according to fresh statistics published by the Australian Bureau of Statistics.

The ABS figures show the number of people who were trade union members in their main job fell from 17 per cent in August 2013 to only 15 per cent in August 2014.

The fall in union membership occurred across the economy, with union membership in the private sector falling from 12 to 11 per cent, and public sector membership falling from 42 to 39 per cent.

This means that Australia’s rate of union membership is now less than a quarter of what it was at it’s peak in 1962 (61 per cent). Since 1992, it’s fallen by over a third, from 40 to 15 per cent.

This leaves the Australian Labor Party (ALP) as the sole place where union membership has flourished—as IPA research has found, 17 of 25 sitting ALP Senators (68 per cent), and 23 of 55 ALP MPs (42 per cent), are former union officials.

This glaring disparity between union membership and political power is a direct result of the deep interconnected relationship between the ALP and the union movement. Such disproportionate influence of a single interest group is a problem for Australian democracy.


For more on union influence in the ALP, read the IPA’s 2015 report: Unions in Labor: A handbrake on reform (by myself and James Paterson)

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